Tag Archives: San Francisco Murals

Konorebi, “Stag.” (Weekly Photo Challenge: Close Up)

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Good Evening:

Brand new mural in the Lower Haight, about 50 feet from the intersection of Haight & Fillmore:

Konorebi: "Stag."

Konorebi: “Stag.”

Not bad at all, but if you look close up, you will see an extreme rarity among San Francisco murals: a variation of Pointillist technique. “Konorebi” seems to be the pseudonym of a woman named Nora Bruhn, whom you can find on Instagram. Here, instead of using tiny dots of primary colors, she used white. Here are some closer looks.

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I think she used her fingertips to apply the white paint. As far as I can tell, Konorebi is mostly a photographer, but this represents a nice change of pace for both her and for San Francisco murals.

Vonn Scott Bair

New Photo Puzzle! (Weekly Photo Challenge: Vivid)

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Good Evening:

I’ve done a few of these before, so you might already know the rules. First, this mural in the Lower Haight, product of a artist with a most vivid imagination:

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Now, some closeups:

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And now, the challenge: can you place the closeups in their proper locations in the mural?

Have fun.

Vonn Scott Bair

New San Francisco Murals, 6 June 2015. (Weekly Photo Challenge: Vivid.)

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Good Morning:

Living in San Francisco, possibly the world’s most “muralized” city in terms of murals per square mile, kinda sorta gives one an easy source of inspiration for vivid pictures. Erie Street in the Mission District, actually more of an alley, has served as a canvas for artists for years. The murals normally don’t last more than a year before replacement; here are four of the newer ones.

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Vonn Scott Bair

San Francisco’s Newest & Biggest Mural

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Good Evening:

This one could not have been easy. I don’t know if this is San Francisco’s largest mural, but during The Magic Hour, it looks rather fairly reasonably spectacular.

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I just wish the Moon would stop shrinking when I photograph it. You can find the mural in a desolate part of San Francisco’s East Coast near Illinois and Amador (actually, it’s quite lively during work days–people only become rare on the weekends) where sidewalks disappear and the streets look like they appeared in at least one Fast & Furious movie.

At least for a while.

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In truth, the land in this neighborhood is being recycled–big environmental cleanups everywhere, followed by thousands of units of new housing. If San Francisco is not change, then San Francisco is not at all, and this is needed change. However, I can’t help but think of the effort that went into this work of art. This might be San Francisco’s biggest and newest mural, but I can’t say that it will last forever.

Vonn Scott Bair

Murals Blooming (Weekly Photo Challenge: Spring!)

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Good Evening:

Spring means new murals in San Francisco, blooming everywhere. The middle of the 1100 block of Market Street has two construction sites protected by temporary plywood walls, which translated into mural-ese means close to 100 feet of blank canvas begging for a paint job. Here are three new complete ones, covering the plywood protecting a future office-school-theater of the American Conservatory Theater.

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On Sunday, three artists worked on new murals for the adjoining construction site. One was willing to take a break and answer a few questions about the short life span of San Francisco murals. He’s the gentleman in the picture below.

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Murals get replaced frequently; ’tis a rare mural that lasts more than one year, and many only last six months. This muralist works quite often with the two gentlemen who worked on either side of him, and here are their pieces, which replaced their own older work.

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I learned that there exist two primary reasons why murals get replaced so often. The first did not surprise me–graffiti. After a while, murals receive so much disrespectful mistreatment that it becomes simplest simply to paint over everything and create a new art work.

The second reason might surprise you–contracts.

Yes, contracts. Many murals last for only six or twelve months because the contract the muralist signs with the construction company (or whoever else hires them) stipulates that life span. Then the next artist comes in and paints over the old art with a mural lasting another six or twelve months, or perhaps the same artist creates a new one.

Since the artists not only photograph the finished murals, they also videotape the act of creation, they don’t mind the fact that their work doesn’t last. Their photographs and videos become more permanent versions of the original painting. This attitude of the artists toward their own art will a require a bit of adjustment in my own thinking. I have grown used to reading and viewing plays written 25 centuries ago, not to mention looking at sculptures of the same age. The notion that something like a painting designed/contracted for transience feels a bit odd right now.

Vonn Scott Bair

The Artists Leave Their Mark (Weekly Photo Challenge: Letters)

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Good Morning:

And good Heavens, your faithful correspondent has gotten old, hasn’t he? Don’t know if the people who create San Francisco’s magnificent murals call themselves artists, muralists, painters, or taggers. Do know that they do like to leave their mark, and they do like to leave it artistically. All pictures taken on 26 April 2014 with a Nikon D40 DSLR, unedited.

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Vonn Scott Bair